Our Donors

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Anabel Pelham, Ph.D.

Dr. Anabel Pelham is an Emerita faculty member of the San Francisco State University Gerontology program, and its founding director. She enjoyed a distinguished career as a professor at SF State for nearly thirty five years, and retired in 2013. During her tenure, Dr. Pelham served as Gerontology’s chair and director of the university’s Institute on Gerontology. She is also President of the National Association of Professional Gerontologists (NAPG), and past president of the California Council on Gerontology and Geriatrics (CCGG).

The primary focus of Dr. Pelham’s teaching and research is gerontology curriculum development and international aging. As of 2013, Dr. Pelham continues to teach part time at SF State and internationally, and mentors students in ways that are enhanced by her extraordinary work in the community. Dr. Pelham serves as chair of the Los Altos Senior Commission, and the Program Manager of the new Center for Age-Friendly Excellence. From this platform, and as a nationally recognized leader in community-based movements to encourage age-friendly design standards, she led a successful project pioneering policy and infrastructure development that would pragmatically benefit seniors. As a result, Los Altos and Los Altos Hills was designated by the United Nations World Health Organization as the first “Global Age-Friendly City” in California.

As the recipient of critical scholarship support from generous donors during her own experience as a student, Dr. Pelham intends for this scholarship to encourage its recipients to remain steadfast in their pursuit of higher education regardless of the challenges they might face. Dr. Pelham hopes to inspire them, by her own example, to enrich the reputation, body of knowledge, impact and efficacy of the field of Gerontology through their professional pursuits and service to the community. Similarly, she also hopes to inspire other colleagues- and the Pelham Scholarship recipients themselves one day – to be as philanthropic as possible in order to encourage and assist generations to come.

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Donna S. Kline

Donna S. Kline earned her Master’s Degree in Music at SF State under the mentorship of Professor William Corbett-Jones. His teachings inspired Donna to pursue outstanding educational opportunities and experiences. This training has given Ms. Kline far reaching and lasting benefits as a musician and author.

The Donna S. Kline Scholarship Endowment in Creative Arts In Memory of Joanne Rae Kline was established to help strengthen and permanently support the Music Department at San Francisco State University. It is her intent this scholarship will provide financial assistance to a junior, senior, or graduate student enrolled in music classes as a major or minor at SF State, and give a motivated and focused music student these same opportunities.

The Sylvan and Donna Kline Guardian Scholars Scholarship Endowment in Memory of Joanne Rae Kline was established to strengthen and permanently support SF State’s Guardian Scholars Program, with its unique mission and purpose of supporting the needs of college-bound students who are transitioning out of the foster care system. The Klines want to help ensure the future success of the program and permanently support its goals of graduating and empowering foster youth to become self-supporting adults, conscious community leaders, role models and competent professionals in their fields of interest.

Both of these awards were created to honor the memory of Joanne Rae Kline, the daughter of Sylvan and Donna Kline, who empowered others through her advocacy of education. Joanne chose a career path that taught others to believe in themselves, and to reach for higher goals through education. The US Department of Health and Human Services contracted the educational software company Leapfrog Incorporated, to produce an educational book teaching basic healthcare practices to Afghani woman. Leapfrog asked Joanne to lead the project as an Executive Producer for the company, and accompanied her employer in Washington DC to present the project. Fluent in Spanish, Joanne’s quest also led her to serve in Bolivia, where she taught local teachers under the auspices of Save the Children Foundation to use computers more effectively. Joanne Rae Kline’s life embodied the spirit of empowerment and generosity to others which parallels the spirit embodied in the creation of the Donna S. Kline Scholarship Endowment in Creative Arts and the Sylvan and Donna Kline Guardian Scholars Scholarship Endowment in her memory.

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Family and Friends of Jason Louis Zarri

The Jason Louis Zarri Memorial Scholarship is supported by Jason’s family and friends.

Jason grew up in Concord, CA and attended St. Agnes Catholic School from kindergarten through the 7th grade.Jason’s family endured some tragedies which greatly impacted Jason. He began to suffer from mental illness at age 10. He persevered and took several courses at DVC in Pleasant Hill. He was attracted to philosophy and studied at San Francisco State, where he stood out for his knowledge and kindness, and earned his BA degree and worked as a Teacher’s Assistant. He truly was a great reader and student, with a very logical mind. He founded the website Scholardarity with his friend Peter. Its mission is bringing scholars and students together to push the frontiers of knowledge with papers in History, Philosophy, Literature, Religion, Education and Theology. In spite of his great suffering from a bipolar brain disorder, he became the very special young man that so many of his friends, fellow students and professors have spoken of so highly.

See here for Jason’s Obituary and Remembrances

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Family and Friends of Kyle Campbell Whitham McLeod

Kyle Campbell Whitham McLeod, a 22 year old African-American senior studying history at San Francisco State University, died in 2007. Kyle loved reading, music of all kinds, and history, particularly Latin American history. He made fast and deep friendships, often introducing his friends to classic rock, blues, or reggae music or to books by his favorite authors. He was sensitive to the plight of others, whether friends in need or the homeless he met in the streets of San Francisco. Kyle often spoke in anger at the continuing rise in California State University fees, aware that he had family able to help him while others struggled to stay in school.

Kyle’s parents, Gearey McLeod and Cynthia Whitham, and sister Miranda McLeod—with the generosity of family, friends, and colleagues—created a scholarship at SF State in Kyle’s honor. In Kyle’s memory, each year a junior at SF State in good standing, majoring in Latin American History, whose values reflect concern for the others, is awarded a partial scholarship which the awardee may use to lower his or her fees in the next year. Recipient of this generous gift is chosen by the History Department Faculty each year.

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Family of Christy Kearney

This scholarship was created in honor of Christy Kearney, who died on 2/20/10 after fighting a long and courageous battle with breast cancer. Christy was an extraordinary nurse who touched countless people’s lives. She was generous, compassionate, fearless, and had the natural ability to infuse humor and creativity into her nursing practice. She was fiercely committed to working with underserved and disenfranchised populations, including the homeless and mentally ill, and devoted most of her career to community-based nursing, including working as a psychiatric nurse at SF General, an AIDS nurse case manager for Westside Community Clinic at the height of the AIDS epidemic, a home hospice nurse and eventually as a clinical instructor here at SF State. She believed in the value of holistic medicine and experienced firsthand the benefits of this during her own illness.

A quote from one of her patients demonstrates the compassion and dedication Christy embodied- “Even with her lupus and all, she’d walk up all these steps with a case of Ensure under her arm and bring other goodies and never complained. She never rushed out the door and stayed here until her job was done. You could tell that Christy really cared. She was such an angel.”

As one of her former colleagues once said, “she was a loving soul who spent her life caring for others. She was the kind of nurse we should all aspire to be.”

We hope that this scholarship will provide SFSU nursing students with the inspiration to carry on Christy’s nursing philosophy and values for many generations to come.

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Family of Diana T.Y. Chung

The Diana T.Y. Chung Memorial Scholarship was established in 2004 with a generous donation from her husband, Mr. Henry Chung, and was San Francisco State University’s first-ever scholarship for international students.

Mrs. Diana T.Y. Chung was born on April 3, 1919 in Hunan, China and was the youngest of six children. A physical education teacher and avid athlete in China before she moved to the United States in 1948, Diana Chung was also a longtime supporter of educational causes. She helped finance the rebuilding of a school in her hometown of Changsha, China, and together with her husband Henry, sponsored many students and scholars from China to attend SF State. The Chungs also helped establish an orientation and training program at SF State for Chinese scholars and, over the years, have generously donated to various SF State endeavors.

Diana was a successful entrepreneur and business woman. In 1974, Diana and Henry Chung opened the Hunan Restaurant, introducing the spicy cuisine of their native Hunan, China province to San Francisco. Due to her hard work and business savvy, the business prospered and today there are six successful locations of the restaurant in San Francisco, all still owned and operated by the Chung family. Diana was also interested and talented in real estate investment with a keen eye for valuable properties. She remained active in real estate management until her final years.

In her spare time, Diana enjoyed music, calligraphy, painting, landscape design, traveling and spending time with her family. She visited every major continent and enjoyed sightseeing and learning about other cultures and foods. Just like the old Chinese saying, “Traveling ten thousand miles is worth more than reading ten thousand books,” her travel experiences greatly contributed to her appreciation of other cultures and to her achievements in business.

In 2002, Diana Chung was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and after a courageous fight with the disease, she passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family on April 10, 2003.

“Diana Chung believed very strongly in the values of higher education to better one’s life, career and community,” said Henry Chung, Diana’s husband of 57 years. “With this scholarship, we hope to help students from other countries earn college degrees and then utilize their knowledge and skills to the benefit of their families, home country and the United States.”

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Family of Dorothy L. Davis

The Dorothy L. Davis Memorial Scholarship was created by Dick and Diana Glanville in memory of their wonderful aunt, to honor her passion for the nursing profession.

Dorothy Lovenia Davis was born and raised in Candler, a small mountain town near Asheville, North Carolina. She was the second youngest of 11 siblings. Upon graduation from high school, she moved alone to Atlanta, Georgia to attend nursing school at Grady Hospital, where she graduated in 1943.

She was immediately commissioned into the U.S. Army Nurse Corps as World War II was raging in Europe and the Pacific. After Army basic training, she was posted to Shanghai and spent the next two years in China, Burma and India applying her nursing skills under very difficult conditions. Dorothy had to fight the impact of these experiences throughout much of her later life, like many others of that era.

After the war, Dorothy disembarked in the U.S. at San Francisco and chose to establish a new life on the West Coast. She spent her working life as a practicing clinical nurse, mostly at the former Letterman Hospital in the Presidio. She remained in the U.S. Army Reserve for over 40 years and obtained the rank of Colonel. Always interested in bettering herself, Dorothy took classes at San Francisco State College, and received a B.A. in Education in 1961.

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Family of George C. Feliz

At the time of his death on March 29, 2000, Dr. George C. Feliz was Professor Emeritus of Economics at San Francisco State University. He received three degrees from Stanford, a baccalaureate degree with honors in 1930, an MBA in 1934, and a Ph.D in 1949.

Dr. Feliz began his teaching profession in the 1930’s. In 1946, he joined San Francisco State University as an assistant professor of business. His distinguished accomplishments included becoming the first dean of graduate studies at SF State. In this role, he gave impetus and direction to the expansion of the university’s graduate degree programs and fostered development of faculty and student services. He also served the California State University system and helped shape future curriculum, teaching, libraries, and worked tirelessly on subjects related to the improvement of graduate programs and services to students. In recognition of his pioneering service to the profession of teaching, he was elected chairman of the Western Association of Graduate Schools.

After retiring from San Francisco State University in 1975, Dr. Feliz moved to Contra Costa County. There, through his post-retirement activities, he made many contributions to the community. The George C. Feliz Scholarships in Economics and Environmental Studies were initially created by a gift from Dr. Feliz and have since been supported by his son Don Feliz.

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Family of Joanne Rae Kline

The Donna S. Kline Scholarship Endowment in Creative Arts In Memory of Joanne Rae Kline was established to help strengthen and permanently support the Music Department at San Francisco State University. The Sylvan and Donna Kline Guardian Scholars Scholarship Endowment in Memory of Joanne Rae Kline was established to strengthen and permanently support SF State’s Guardian Scholars Program, with its unique mission and purpose of supporting the needs of college-bound students who are transitioning out of the foster care system. The Klines want to help ensure the future success of the program and permanently support its goals of graduating and empowering foster youth to become self-supporting adults, conscious community leaders, role models and competent professionals in their fields of interest.

These awards were created to honor the memory of Joanne Rae Kline, pictured above, the daughter of Sylvan and Donna Kline, who empowered others through her advocacy of education. Joanne chose a career path that taught others to believe in themselves, and to reach for higher goals through education. The US Department of Health and Human Services contracted the educational software company Leapfrog Incorporated, to produce an educational book teaching basic healthcare practices to Afghani woman. Leapfrog asked Joanne to lead the project as an Executive Producer for the company, and accompanied her employer in Washington DC to present the project. Fluent in Spanish, Joanne’s quest also led her to serve in Bolivia, where she taught local teachers under the auspices of Save the Children Foundation to use computers more effectively. Joanne Rae Kline’s life embodied the spirit of empowerment and generosity to others which parallels the spirit embodied in the creation of the Donna S. Kline Scholarship Endowment in Creative Arts and the Sylvan and Donna Kline Guardian Scholars Scholarship Endowment in her memory.

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Family of Robert and Elizabeth Hemphill

Robert and Elizabeth Hemphill

Robert and Elizabeth Hemphill had a deep interest in issues of culture, language, education, and society throughout their careers and lives. The scholarship that their sons Robert Jr. and David Hemphill have donated in their names is meant to support SF State Graduate College of Education students who are pursuing the same issues in their own studies and lives.

Col. Robert Frederick Hemphill (USAF, Retired) had a long and distinguished military career that featured many years spent in Japan. He saw World War II combat service in the Pacific with the decorated 507th Fighter Group, and at the end of the war Robert elected to remain in what became the US Air Force. He served for over 26 years as a pilot, judge advocate, operations planner, and diplomat. Fluent in spoken Japanese, Robert was proudest of his service as Air Attaché at the American Embassy in Tokyo, Japan from 1964 to 1967. Upon completion of his Air Attaché assignment in Tokyo, Robert received an award seldom given to foreigners, the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Degree, from the government of Japan in recognition of his distinguished service to both countries. Robert was an active member and leader of several church congregations and was also a clever and gifted storyteller, and published a book of humorous children’s stories. He was also a prolific poet, and compiled a book of poetry entitled “Hand Me Downs” (1996). Upon retirement from military service, Robert lived in Hawaii for 20 years, serving as a legislative staff member in the Hawaii State Legislature. He subsequently moved to Olympia, WA, where he also lived for 20 years.

Elizabeth Anne (“Betty”) Roach Hemphill received her BA in Fine Arts from the University of Nebraska and her MA in History of Religion from George Washington University, studying with Dr. Clifton Olmstead, a noted historian of American religion. She lived in Japan for over twelve years, accompanying her husband on military assignment, and this experience with the Japanese culture resulted in the publication of four books: Missions at Work, A Treasure to Share, The Road to Keep, and The Least of These. During this period she was also a counselor and trustee of Japan International Christian University. When she returned to the United States to live in Hawaii, Betty Hemphill’s interests in Japanese and Christian themes broadened to include women’s issues. She published a book of poetry, Third Testament Women, in Hawaii in 1979. She was a leader in activities of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), and served as president of the Hawaii State Division from 1978 to 1982. In 1982, she was one of five women honored by the YWCA of Hawaii for community leadership, and she was a member and past chair of the Library Advisory Commission, City and County of Honolulu. Betty was the mother of three children, Robert F. Hemphill, Jr., Virginia Anne Adams and David F. Hemphill.

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In Honor of Dr. Betty Parent

When Betty Parent, PhD became the first full professor in American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, she established a precedent of excellence in teaching, research, and community service that many American Indians seek to emulate.

The Betty Parent Achievement Award is being created in her name, and with her permission, to recognize Dr. Parent’s achievement and on-going inspiration. The Award will honor outstanding students making similar strides in their academic progress and service to American Indian communities.

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In Honor Of Florence Hale Stephenson

Beginning in 1918, Florence Hale Stephenson was the department chair for Physical Education at the San Francisco State Normal School. Throughout an extraordinary career, she dedicated her life to advancing opportunities and expanding possibilities for women in education and athletics. Florence broke down barriers and profoundly transformed the lives of countless scholars. She was a mentor to generations of educators and created a foundation for excellence. Florence’s legacy endures to this day with the support of faculty, alumnae and friends, many of whom have become mentors in their own right to new generations of scholars and educators. The scholarships they support honor students that demonstrate both professional promise and the enduring commitment to improving the lives of girls and young women exemplified by Florence Hale Stephenson and so many of the faculty and alumnae for whom she was a mentor and visionary.

The photo included in this profile was taken at the annual Florence Hale Stephenson Brunch, attended by just a few of the many generations of faculty Florence’s work and legacy affected.

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In Memory of Alison Won

The objective of the Alison Won Memorial Scholarship is to promote and encourage the development of undergraduate students in the fields of nursing. The scholarship was established by Alison’s life-long friend, Kathryn Harkavy Larson.

In memory of Alison Won, BS Nursing, 1987
By Kathryn Harkavy Larson, BSN/PHN/RN, ‘1987

“I encountered Alison in one of the mile-long book lines at SFSU the day before classes began in 1984. Serendipity presented itself when we both discovered we were first year nursing students. From that day forward, a strong friendship developed that would last almost 33 years until she suddenly passed away in 2016 at age 55. She was my dearest friend in life, a sister to me, an Auntie to my daughter. A thoughtful woman with an unstoppable enthusiastic zest for life, a whirlwind of energy at every age. Her warm winning smile and a penetrable laugh her signature and frequent attributes. A well-honed multi-tasker, patient listener, loved by friends, family, co-workers and patients.

Like many of you, she worked hard and patiently to fulfill her dream of becoming a RN. During her senior year she rotated in the ICU at California Pacific Medical Center. In fact, Alison would never leave CPMC for 29 years as a stellar beloved nurse rotating through TICU, TCU and telemetry. The girl with the biggest heart became devoted to Cardiac Care. That signature smile along with her innate leadership skills reassured and endeared her to hundreds of patients and co-workers.

Alison’s biggest accomplishment in life was her daughter whom she, as a single mom, adopted as an infant in China. A devoted tireless mother who enthusiastically ensured her daughter was exposed to and participated in many activities, Alison never spent one night away from her until the day she passed. Her young daughter was just ten years old then.

I know what it is like to financially struggle throughout college. To juggle numerous jobs, while still working hard to achieve good grades and take pride in all my clinicals. I was fortunate to have had a wonderful varied nursing career which molded me into the person I am, along with my friendship for Alison Won. I will always be grateful to have had both. It is my hope that this scholarship makes life a bit less stressful for you as you pursue your passion, and that you will remember Alison’s story.

I hope that you take heed of the words of longtime sports reporter Craig Sager: ‘Time is something that cannot be bought. It cannot be waged with God. It’s not in endless supply. Time is simply how you live your life.’

Remember these times as part of your life’s adventures and make them memorable for you and others. Enjoy the learning process and life’s friendships along the way."

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In Memory of Otto J. Bos

Otto J. Bos was a 1970 graduate of the department, editor of its award-winning newspaper Phoenix and an All-American soccer star. Following graduation, he became a government and politics reporter at The San Diego Union. In 1977, Otto became press secretary for San Diego Mayor Pete Wilson. Otto continued to serve Wilson as he later was elected a U.S. senator and then California governor. At the time of his death of a heart attack in 1991, Otto was Gov. Wilson’s director of communications and public affairs.

The scholarship honors Otto’s commitment to journalism and his dedication to public service. Throughout his career, Otto was admired not only for these ideals, but also for his compassion, decency, zest for competition and good-humored nature. The scholarship is intended to encourage and recognize meritorious students whose work and values reflect those held by Otto.

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Janice and John Gumas

Janice Herwegh Gumas
B.S. 1985 Marketing
Community Leader and Parent Advocate

Janice Herwegh Gumas is a former marketing executive who became a leading advocate for parent engagement at San Francisco State University. She earned a B.S. in marketing in 1985 and enjoyed a successful career in advertising, developing media strategies for local, national, and international clients. When her oldest son enrolled at SF State, Janice brought her business expertise and insight as an alumna to a new role at SF State as founding president of the Parents Council, serving as an advocate for parents and encouraging them to stay informed and involved in their children’s education. She was instrumental in launching outreach to parents and families on social media and helped establish the University’s first regional Parents Council chapter in Southern California. She also represented SF State throughout the California State University system at advocacy, alumni, and parent events. Mrs. Gumas received the 2016 Alumni Service Award at SF State’s President’s Dinner and Alumni Hall of Fame.

John Gumas
B.S. 1984 Marketing
President, Gumas Advertising

John Gumas founded Gumas Advertising in 1984, a full-service firm, encompassing branding, advertising, marketing, and creative strategic vision for promotional development. Today, the award-winning firm serves a host of regional, national and international clients. In addition, Mr. Gumas is the author of the popular book, Marketing Smart. Mr. Gumas is on the boards of many non-profits, including the San Francisco Giants Community Fund, The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, The Greater San Francisco Advertising Club, The California Geo-Tourism Council and The Elios Society. He has served on the SF State Foundation Board since 2008. He is the immediate past chair of the Foundation and currently serves on its Executive Committee. Mr. Gumas was named 2008 CSU Alumni Advocate of the Year and was inducted into SF State’s Alumni Hall of Fame in 2010.

Janice and John Gumas Endowed Marketing Scholarship

Janice and John Gumas met while studying Marketing at San Francisco State University. Over the years, both have been tremendous supporters and leaders in the SF State community. Janice is the founding President of the San Francisco State University Parents Council, while John serves as Chair of the Campaign Cabinet and Immediate Past Chair of the SF State Foundation Board.They have created an inspiring opportunity for students in the College of Business with the Janice and John Gumas Endowed Marketing Scholarship.

“As graduates of SF State and the College of Business, Janice and I know that the education and training students receive in the Marketing Department is vital to their future success” John Gumas says. “We are proud to give back, to support students as they prepare to embark on their own careers.”

The Janice and John Gumas Endowed Marketing Scholarship provides critical funds for students pursuing undergraduate and graduate degrees in Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing.

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Jerold and Phyllis Rosenberg

Jerold Rosenberg has said that “you never know when brilliance will come out in a student”. In this spirit, he created the Jerold Rosenberg Family Scholarship to ensure that promising individuals with talent are given a chance to succeed.

The Rosenberg Scholarship supports recipients through the duration of their education at SF State, at both the undergraduate and graduate level, after their freshman year. Mr. Rosenberg tailored the scholarship to support students who have not yet reached their full potential due to financial or personal circumstances. The scholarship is available to students earning between a 2.5 and 3.25 GPA to ensure that these students get access to the resources they need to flourish.

Jerold Rosenberg earned his Bachelor of Arts degree at San Francisco State in 1962. During the summer session of 1964, Jerold was a participant in the San Francisco State around the world tour, a pivotal learning experience.​" Jerold completed graduate work at San Francisco State and attended University of California Hastings College of the Law. In 1968, he established The Rosenberg Company, a full insurance brokerage company, where he continues to work.

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Marjorie Stern

Marjorie H. Stern was inducted into the SF State Alumni Hall of Fame in 1995. She was a teacher, unionist, author, senior and women’s rights advocate as well as a founding member of both the Coalition of Labor Union Women and the AFT Women’s Rights Committee.

Marjorie graduated from high school in Chicago during the Great Depression. She immediately wanted to enroll in college courses, but faced financial hardship as well as opposition from her family. “My father said I was only a girl and was going to get married anyways. I still wanted to go to college. I always wanted to go to college. I guess I felt I was worth going to college." Stern saved while working in Chicago. She supported her husband through his own graduate education. After the birth of her fourth child left Marjorie functionally blind for six months, she was more determined than ever to obtain her own higher education: “I decided during that long, dark period, I would go back to school, no matter what it took.”

Working as a secretary and mothering four children, she started college at age 36 at San Francisco State University and graduated 4th in her class, receiving her bachelor’s degree from SF State in 1958. After obtaining her degree, Stern taught American History and Government, English and Home Economics at Galileo High School for 22 years, “Women in the Labor Force” and related skills courses at night at SF Community College for five years, and “Women in Unions” at SF State for one year.

Over her life, Marjorie received numerous honors for her efforts for women, educators and senior citizens, including from the National Organization of Women, CLUW, and the Senior Action Network. She established this scholarship to give back to SF State, which gave her “a chance at the age of 36 to become a student and not be discriminated against because I was a woman.” The Marjorie H. Stern Scholarship supports women’s rights and social justice by helping Women and Gender Studies (WGS) students in immediate financial need remain in school.

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Regional Parks Foundation of the East Bay Regional Parks District

The Regional Parks Foundation created the Carol Severin Endowed Internship Scholarship Fund to honor Dr. Carol Severin. Dr. Severin is an SF State professor emerita in the Recreation, Parks and Tourism (RPT) department, who taught at SF State for forty years, retiring in 2001. Carol Severin taught classes ranging from management, programming, alpine skiing to arts and crafts for leisure. A favorite of hers was to lead student groups to ski in Europe, and she is well-known for the jewelry she creates. Additionally, Dr. Severin served on the East Bay Regional Park District Board of Directors for over twenty years, recently retiring in 2015.

Carol Severin has enjoyed an extraordinary career in the Parks, Recreation and Tourism profession, and is an expert in the field of RPT. Over the course of her career, Dr. Severin supported RPT Initiatives in California through her outstanding contributions in leadership, strategic·planning, partnership/coalition building, communications, and as a creator of experiences at the local, state and national levels for a multitude of recreation and parks organizations and other significant contributions over her sixty-year professional recreation and parks career. Carol received many professional awards for her achievement, including distinguished service awards from Society of Recreation Professionals, California Parks and Recreation Society and California Association of Recreation and Park Districts, to name a few.

The Regional Parks Foundation’s objective in establishing and endowing the Severin scholarship was to assist undergraduate students who are in financial need and intend to enter the RPT profession as a career.